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Elbow tendonitis

Discussion started by martin 3 years ago
I imagine that I am not the only one battling chronic elbow tendonitis on the inner part of my elbows. Commonly referred to as "golfer's elbow". I would appreciate any imput on treatment or even better a cure. My orthopedic surgeon's advice is to take some time off -well that's not an option.

In advance, thanks for your imput
Martin
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Ryan
Ryan
Hey Martin, One thing that may help with the stress on your elbow is keeping your bottom hand low. One thing I tell my students to do is to put your paddle over your head and make 90 degree angles with both arms like a goal post. It may feel like your hands are a little far apart at first, but you'll notice it puts a lot less stress on your joints. Remember technique and finesse can really make up for brute strength.

Have you watched any of Jim Terrell/QuickbladePaddle's YouTube videos? Great info!

2 years ago
janet
janet
Rest, ice, and when you do start paddling again you have to correct your technique of gripping the paddle. Wrist flexion on your grip of the handle is what is affecting the muscle group and the tendons - your paddle might be the wrong size, just off an inch or two also...
2 years ago
Frank Long
Frank Long
Unfortunately, your orthopaedist was correct. During the acute phase, which is when it is hurting you, rest, ice and anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen will help. But sadly to an active paddler, rest is the key. When it's not hurting you, concentrate on good technique, as previously discussed. Think of your arms as only a means to hold the paddle in the "triangle of power", and let your core muscles do the work. Use only a couple of fingers to grip with the lower hand. Think of it as only a lever. During your paddles after the pain subsides, try using a smaller blade. Also, some people claim that the tendon stabilizers that players with tennis elbow use, helps with the prevention of new inflammation. Also, try and refine your technique so that the catch, power stroke, and recovery produces no splash. Don't apply power until the blade is smoothly engaged. See how silent you can be! Stealth SUP.
2 years ago
Willy Mendez
Willy Mendez
I am going through this same problem right now. I don’t think it was my technique that caused it. It was over training. I’m not a doctor, but this is what I have learned and helped me. The forearm muscles become tight and pull the tendons that attach to the elbow joint. This causes inflammation. Here is the bad news. You have to take a break from paddling. It’s the only way to heal. Massage the forearm muscle so it can stretch and take away the pressure off the tendon. Wear a forearm strap. ($10.00) This also helps take the pressure off the tendon. Ice it to reduce inflammation. Gradually return back to paddling. Good luck. I feel your pain.
2 years ago
Rob Casey
Rob Casey
when paddling, are you using a death grip on the paddle or holding it lightly? also using your torso for power vs just your arms.

treatment: yoga is great. it really helped me with shoulder tendonitis. massage is good if you can find a great masseuse and can get a prescription to go. i use one for migraines which helps considerably.
3 years ago
Jill Johnson
Jill Johnson
I'm in the middle of having this issue as well....accupunture seems to help, but trying to not do a ton of weight training.
3 years ago
Filippo Petraroli
Filippo Petraroli
Smaller and softer shaft paddle helps to riduce the stress. Wider diameter of shaft reduces elbow stress.
A "new" therapy,not invasive, pheraps can helps you: "tecar therapy". http://www.docredaelli.com/eng/news/tecar terapia.pdf
Ciao
3 years ago
Alex Mauer
Alex Mauer
Take a look at this to help out with your golfer's elbow. http://supconnect.mylocallineup.com/index.php?option=com_community&view=groups&task=viewdiscussion&groupid=86&topicid=249&Itemid=70
3 years ago
Chris Hollingsworth
Chris Hollingsworth
Martin,
I'm with you my friend... sometimes it kills to lift a glass of water. No way to the time-off cure... doctors usually say wear a sling don't use the arm. I'm not a believer. Make sure you are getting all necessary minerals for your soft tissues. Cortisone injections are one of the last options but I would stay away from that as long as you can!
Keep paddling!!!!
3 years ago
martin
martin
Thanks All

Nikki -Thanks for your reply, I have made it a point to make sure I am not over gripping or bending my elbow and that in conjuction to switching to a 90sq. in QB paddle from a 100sq. in paddle seems to be working so well that I have postponed my appointment with my orthopedic surgeon for a couple of weeks. Thanks and cheers.

Ali-acupuncture was a no go..

Alex- started paddling 4 months ago and racing 3months ago. I am training 5 days a week. Each workout being between 4.5miles and 8miles. I also train with a local pro to fine tune my stroke. The tendenitis was a problem before SUP, mostly as a result of too many pull ups and curls while doing P90X. So far ice and Aleve are keeping it in check.
Martin
3 years ago
Ali Pereira
Ali Pereira
Very good question - I'm a fellow sufferer! Have you tried acupuncture? I was recommended it so am just trying a few sessions to see if it helps - I'll let you know how I get on!!

Nikki - thanks for the tips - I shall get someone to watch my technique and see if that might be exacerbating mine.

Any others tips/suggestions folks?
3 years ago
Nikki Gregg
Nikki Gregg
Two possible reasons:

1. Over-gripping the paddle with bottom hand
2. Excessively bending bottom arm during power and recovery phase of the stroke

Hope that helps!
3 years ago
Andre Niemeyer
Andre Niemeyer
Good question! I haven't had this problem but hopefully others well be able to shine some light here on prevention and cure.
3 years ago
Alex Mauer
Alex Mauer
How often do you paddle and how long are your sessions? How long have you been paddling? Where did you learn your stroke tecknique?
3 years ago

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